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Emoji Gem 1.0 Release

02/12/2014 Comments off

Emoji Gem:

Earlier this week, we are proud to release the complete 1.0 version of the emoji gem on RubyGem.org for public use.

What is Emoji?

Emoji are cartoonish icon characters, distributed as a UTF-8 font, like this heart: ❤. Using emoji began in Japan with mobile phones, but has grown in popularity throughout the internet over the last 3-4 years. Unfortunately, emoji character support is incomplete in many cases (like the Chrome browser). Users of Polar Polls easily add emoji on their iPhones and we wanted to support them. However, we needed a way to support emoji on unsupported web platforms.

Enter the emoji gem. The emoji gem bundles a comprehensive emoji index and a complete emoji image library from Phantom Open Emoji. This gem provides a fast and simple Ruby translation between UTF-8, moji characters, and image representations. Additionally, this gem implements a Rails engine that serves up the Emoji image library when replacing characters with images. This gem works in all Ruby interpreters, but will load a native-optimized string engine if it’s available (everywhere but JRuby).

Backstory

This project began after-hours at the Burlington Ruby Conference in August of 2013. I was having dinner with Steve Klabnik and a handful of other developers at Farmhouse, when Steve mentioned his plans for building an emoji gem. We had struggled with web support for emoji at Polar Polls after enabling emoji support in our iOS app. I exchanged information with Steve and hoped to work together on building a solution.

After the conference, I worked for several weeks putting the first working version together. Steve and I roughed out an outline for the architecture and tools. Shortly after, we opened up the gem to review/contribution from other folks. We were lucky to get several pull requests and I polished a version that Polar Polls could use in production. Over the last 6 months, we’ve collected a handful of fixes and performance tuning to prepare for our 1.0 release.

Thank You!

I’ve been a huge beneficiary of open source software and the community supporting Ruby/Rails. I’m glad to have a chance to build something useful and give back to the community. None of this would have been possible without the following folks:

  • @steveklabnik – for the idea, securing rights to “emoji” gem name, guidance, and publicity for the project
  • @ryan-orr – for transferring the emoji gem account for our new project
  • @mikowitz – for contributing code and adding Ruby String extensions.
  • @semanticart – for contributing code and expanding Ruby version support.
  • @parndt – for improving our docs and README.

A Year of WOW (20% time) at PatientsLikeMe

01/27/2012 1 comment

What is WOW Week?

PatientsLikeMe has built our own version of Google’s “20% Time” that we call “WOW Week”. WOW Week is a week of unstructured development time for engineers, where they can work on anything they choose to improve our products. This lets people focus on their personal passions or explore riskier ideas. See my more detailed post about what WOW Week is and how it works for PatientsLikeMe.

2011 WOW Week Projects in Review

It’s easy to pay lip-service to the idea of 20% time, but PatientsLikeMe actually dedicates entire weeks at a time. This post showcases what a year of WOW produced in 2011. Each of these projects was initiated by an engineer in their own time and most made it into production.

Clinical Trials (In Production)

Credit: James Kebinger and Jeff Dwyer

Provide a friendly search interface to National Clinical Trial registry and automatically match patients within PatientsLikeMe to relavant trials they qualify for.

Clinical Trials

Read more…

WOW Week at PatientsLikeMe

01/20/2012 2 comments

What is WOW Week?

PatientsLikeMe has built our own version of Google’s “20% Time” that we call “WOW Week”. WOW Week is a week of unstructured development time for engineers, where they can work on anything to improve our products as long as they demo their progress in front of the company at the end of the week.

The engineering team works in 2-week long development sprints. After three development sprints in a row, we have a “Technical Debt” week and a WOW Week.

Why a Week at a time versus 20% Time?

It’s easy to pay lip-service to the concept of 20% time for engineers while scheduling a full load of work. I’ve seen this happen many times at other companies. PatientsLikeMe avoids this pitfall by creating a public block of time for the entire company. See the 2011 WOW showcase to see how much we build.

Scheduling a complete week allows a single context-switch into innovation mode for everyone. This maximizes the value of this time, instead of dividing it into smaller chunks that are diluted by context switching and deadlines.

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What Makes a Great Startup Engineer?

03/20/2011 1 comment

(The following is an answer to this question on Quora)

What Makes a Great Startup Engineer?
Working in a startup is both difficult and awesome for the same reasons: very little process/politics, but always more work than anyone has time to do.

  1. Organized & Driven – aka they can Get Shit Done
  2. Smart
  3. Energetic/Passionate
  4. Quick Learner
  5. Not an Asshole, you should enjoy spending time with them

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